I Love Muscovy

Muscovy
free range and in-training for caravan life

Nesting

Two weeks ago I brought home two wives for Drake. Their names are now Mus and Covy. The chap I got them from mentioned they may already be laying fertile eggs as they had been in with drakes.
mmm… so how can they lay fertile eggs after they’ve left this male behind?
I took the first couple of eggs – yes they settled in well and laid the next morning. Tasty, but I kept pondering… time to research.

To begin, from Department of Primary Industries NSW:
The Muscovy originated in Brazil and was domesticated in Europe around 1560. It is known in European countries by various names. Technically, the Muscovy is a member of the goose family, since it grazes and eats grass in the same way as geese.
The Muscovy differs from other breeds in the following ways:
It goes broody and will sit on and hatch eggs of other breeds as well as its own.
It flies, and perches on roosts and trees.
If already mated with members of its own breed, it will not mate with members of other breeds.
Where cross-matings are successful, the crossbred progeny are infertile and are known as ‘mules’.
The drake, unlike in other breeds, has no curl feathers in his tail.
Both male and female Muscovies ‘hiss’ rather than ‘quack’.
Muscovies are poor egg producers, and lay their eggs in clutches; that is, they may lay 20 or so eggs and go broody or pause before producing again.
Its eggs take 35 days to hatch, whereas eggs of other breeds take only 28 days.
Its meat has a lower fat content than that of other ducks.
Physical features
Head — Compared with the rest of its body, the head is rather large. The face is feather-free. There are red caruncles on the face and at the top of the bill.
Body — Slightly arched on top, tends to be rectangular. Muscovies walk rather slowly, with a horizontal carriage. In laying ducks, the abdomen tends to sag.
Legs — Shanks and feet are orange. The shanks are rather short and thick.
Colour — Of the several varieties (for example, white, black, black with white wings), the most suitable for meat production is the white. The white Muscovy produces a white flesh, preferred by the trade, and accounts for about 90% of the colour type used for commercial production.
Read more at: dpi.nsw.gov.au duck raising breeds and breeding

From Milkwood Permaculture: egg mobile with added duck bring on the muscovys

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